blogsensorysystem

Many children with sensory processing difficulties have trouble sleeping, can be distressed with brushing teeth or hair, avoid swings or slides, may play on their own, has trouble with changes in routine or transitioning between tasks, easily distracted, has too much energy or are too lethargic, reactive to sounds, impulsive, overly frustrated or are too forceful with their body movements. Sound familiar?!  Sensory processing difficulties are not uncommon, and Abbey explains the seven sensory systems that can be involved.

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blogsensoryp

Sensory processing is the way the nervous system takes in information from our senses, processing this and then turning it into a response. The response can be behavioral or physiological. It is when the information is not processed or perceived correctly or the response is not appropriate that we have sensory processing difficulties. So sensory processing is an unconscious part of the brain, it allows us to protect ourselves in a dangerous situation.

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blogresilience

More and more we find ourselves in conversations about children with anxiety or worry.  This happens for parents, teachers, and therapists… it is a common topic of discussion and I am a big believer that we don’t need to think of anxiety in children as a disorder or a negative.  What we do need to do is provide children and families with strategies for managing the anxiety when it starts to interfere with how children go about their day. One of the greatest strategies is building resilience.

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 blogsensorybrush

We all have things in life we don’t like the feel of…. Sand on the feet for one person is annoying, whilst someone else might love it.  Everyone has different sensory preferences.  Just because someone does not like something sensory, does not mean they have a disorder, rather a preference to particular things.  When the preference interferes with their emotions, behaviour or performance in daily tasks, we need to look at how we can help the child to overcome this. Brushing is one option that can sooth the sensory system.

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blogpencilrkt

Some children are able to apply to correct amount of pressure through their pencil when writing and colouring.  Others can either push too hard, which can affect the fluency of their movements and make running writing difficult.  Speed of writing can also be affected in this situation, as well as the likelihood of pain when writing for long periods being increased.  Other children press too lightly.  Here are a couple of tips that might help.

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 morningroutinesblog

We meet new families for a variety of reasons but one very common issue most families experience is difficulty with the morning routine. This can include getting ready for school/preschool/daycare, the school drop off, leaving the house for an appointment or anything else. We thought that this would be a great time to give some handy tips to start 2017!

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Do you know a child who loves bear hugs or rough play? Someone who buries themselves under blankets or pillows? Then you may have heard of the term ‘deep pressure’ or ‘heavy work’. This terminology is also referred to as proprioceptive input.

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RKTblogfidget

Have you ever noticed your child touching things with their hands or fidgeting? You may have seen someone do this and thought why can’t you sit still?! Sometimes people don’t even realise they are doing it. There is a reason for it…

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RKTblogtrig 

Paediatric trigger thumb is estimated to represent about 2% of all upper extremity abnormalities in children.

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